Street View Page on China

Outline

  1. Street View screen captures
  2. Links to Street View panoramas
  1. TripGeo Street View Animations
  2. Moore's Where to Invade Next

1 Street View Screen Captures

Street View of Tiananmen Square in Beijing

This view of Tiananmen Square in Beijing focuses on the Monument to the People’s Heroes, an obelisk built in the 1950’s in honor of those who died in the struggle to establish the Communist state in China. Tiananmen Square is home to a number of buildings constructed to honor the Chinese state, including more recently the mausoleum of Chairman Mao.

Street View of the Great Wall at Badaling

This view of the Great Wall from a point near the Badaling access gives both a sense of the length and dimensions of the all and a sense of the detail of its construction. It is one of the few Street View images we were able to find where the details of the wall’s construction were not obscured by hundreds of visitors.

Street View of The Bund in Shanghai

This view looks south along the Bund as it follows the Huangpu River through Shanghai. The buildings to the right are colonial era buildings constructed to house American, European and Russian merchants trading in China. The colonial era buildings contrast with the more modern structures on the other side of the river and visible in the panorama, which are home to today’s business class.

Street View of Hong Kong from Victoria Peak

This view looks west from Victoria Peak toward Hong Kong Harbor over the skyscrapers bordering Hong Kong Harbor. The panorama view provides a sense of how Hong Kong spreads around the peak and along the harbor.

2 Links to Street View Panoramas

Street View of Tiananmen Square in Beijing

Street View of the Great Wall at Badaling

Street View of The Bund in Shanghai

Street View of Hong Kong from Victoria Peak

3 TripGeo Streetview Player

 

 

4 Moore's Where to Invade Next

Armond White states that Michael Moore’s “Where to Invade Next” documentary is a satire blindly criticizing the United States. White says Moore is like Stephen Colbert and John Oliver by using satire to blame their opponents and to flatter themselves. He states that Moore focuses on topics that support the leftist politics, criticizing the United States with no basis in fact. In reality, White’s review is just as one-sided and unbalanced as he accuses Moore’s film of being.

I think Moore is just pointing out real differences between the way the United States approaches certain social problems and the way that other countries do. I believe Michael Moore isn’t just using satire. He doesn’t seem to be funny and nobody is laughing at what he is saying. I also don’t think he is flattering himself. Moore is only showing his point of view and his opinions. As humans, we can be biased about our political views.

I think Moore’s film shows how we can benefit from learning about how other countries approach social problems. I notice that most countries in the documentary tend to work together, and our country could do a lot more of that because most Americans tend to think only of themselves. I also noticed that the people in many of these countries are not workaholics like Americans. If Americans worked less, we would have more healthy and productive lives. Many of the countries had free health care and free higher education. If Americans had a universal health care system, we would be able to take care of the health of both the rich and the poor and the young and the old, and people wouldn’t have to pay so much for health care. For higher education, American students wouldn’t have pay excessive debt to the government and to student lenders.

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Submitted by Leah Johnson on April 7, 2019

 

 

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